> 11-12 weeks before FFD

It is a good idea to erect your supporting structure before you plant seedlings, so you don’t disturb the young plants later.

Peas grow quickly and it is important to get them in the ground before they outgrow the soil in the cell. Don’t keep seedlings indoors any longer than necessary, or they will suffer.

Plant out the transplants carefully, making sure the root ball doesn't fall apart when you take them out of the cell pack.

> 4 weeks before LFD

It is a good idea to erect your supporting structure before you plant seedlings, so you don’t disturb the young plants later.

Peas grow quickly and it is important to get them in the ground before they outgrow the soil in the cell. Don’t keep seedlings indoors any longer than necessary, or they will suffer.

Plant out the transplants carefully, making sure the root ball doesn't fall apart when you take them out of the cell pack.

> Cool, Warm

Peas are cool weather plants, hardy down to 20 degrees (28 degrees F when flowering). They prefer mild temperatures (55 to 75 degrees F) and don't usually set pods above 80 degrees F. In areas with hot summers they are grown as a spring or fall crop (fall planting presents its own problems, however).

It is important to plant your peas early, so that they have enough time to mature before the hot weather sets in. Normally the first peas are planted 2 to 4 weeks before the last frost date.

> When outdoor temp: 45°F to 75°F, optimal temp 60°F to 65°F
> When min soil temp: 45°F

Pea seeds will germinate over a wide temperature range, but do so much faster in warm soil. At 40˚F they may take over a month to germinate (if they don’t rot or get eaten in the meantime). At 70˚F they may take only a week.

These large nutritious seeds are vulnerable once planted, so you don't want them sitting in the soil for too long. For this reason it's best to wait until the soil is at least 45 degrees and preferably 60 degrees. 

Spacing

2.0"-4.0", 8 plants per sq ft

Intensive: Pole varieties are commonly planted in rows because it is easier to support them. They are best planted in double offset rows, with 3" between the plants and 6" between the rows. You can get two of these double rows in a 5-foot wide bed (space them 24 - 30" apart).

Transplant Outdoors

11-12 weeks before FFD

It is a good idea to erect your supporting structure before you plant seedlings, so you don’t disturb the young plants later.

Peas grow quickly and it is important to get them in the ground before they outgrow the soil in the cell. Don’t keep seedlings indoors any longer than necessary, or they will suffer.

Plant out the transplants carefully, making sure the root ball doesn't fall apart when you take them out of the cell pack.

Transplant Outdoors

4 weeks before LFD

It is a good idea to erect your supporting structure before you plant seedlings, so you don’t disturb the young plants later.

Peas grow quickly and it is important to get them in the ground before they outgrow the soil in the cell. Don’t keep seedlings indoors any longer than necessary, or they will suffer.

Plant out the transplants carefully, making sure the root ball doesn't fall apart when you take them out of the cell pack.

Support

At planting

It is a good idea to erect your supporting structure before you plant your seed, so you don't disturb the young plants later. Whatever support you decide upon, it must be sufficiently tall and strong to support the plants. The tangled full size vines and their load of peas can weigh quite a lot (especially when wet or when the wind is blowing).

Pole peas climb by means of slender tendrils and can't grow up thick poles. This means they need a different kind of support from beans. A pea tendril will take about an hour to curl around a slender twig. Chicken wire (or any stiff wire) also works well, either as a fence or a cage of some kind. You can also use a trellis, which can later be used for cucumbers or melons. If you are creative, you can rig up something from poles and string or netting.

Large tomato cages (which aren't needed so early in the season) can work well with Bush Peas.

In England, peas were traditionally supported on stems from hazel shrubs, but any brushwood will do (fruit tree prunings are good). They were trimmed to a flat two dimensional plane and the butt ends were pushed firmly into the ground.