> 4-6 weeks after LFD

Leeks are very hardy and can be transplanted outdoors quite early (6 weeks before the last frost date). However they will grow faster in your greenhouse, so you may as well leave them there until the last frost date. You will then get bigger plants to put into the ground.

The plants should be planted out when they are about 8˝ tall. Some people advise trimming the tops and roots, but it probably isn't a good idea.

Dibber:  The simplest way to plant Leek seedlings is with a dibber. In fact a desire to plant a lot of Leeks is a sufficient reason to get (or make) a dibber.

1. Mark out the required 4˝ to 6˝ hole depth (depending on size of plants) on the side of the dibber, so you know how deep to go.

2. Then, simply punch a series of holes in the soil, and drop a plant into each hole

3. Water the plants by putting a trickle of water in each hole. There is no need to fill the hole with soil, enough soil will wash down into the bottom of the hole to cover the roots. It couldn’t be easier, or quicker.

Trench: You can also transplant the seedlings into a 6˝ to 8˝ deep trench, but it’s a lot more work. Dig the trench, lay the plants in it at the right spacing and then plant them almost up to the growing point. The trench is re-filled slowly to blanch the stems and provide a greater length of the most desirable white stem. If you fill the trench all at once, there is some danger that the stem may rot.

Rows: Leeks can also be planted in a row on level ground. They are then hilled up as they grow, to blanch the lower stems

> Cold, Cool, Warm

Spring: Leeks like a long (4 - 6 month) cool (not much above 70 degrees F) growing season and are one of the first vegetables to be started in spring.

> When outdoor temp: 45°F to 75°F, optimal temp 55°F to 75°F
> When min soil temp: 50°F

Leek seed germinates fairly well in cold soil.

Spacing

3.0"-6.0", 9 plants per sq ft

The spacing for leeks ranges from 3-6" depending upon the fertility of the soil. They are usually planted in offset rows across the bed, so it's possible to hoe between the beds for weeding. To get the highest yield of large plants, space them 6" apart (for giant plants space them 9" apart). You could initially plant leeks closer together and thin as they get bigger. You can eat the thinnings or transplant them.

Transplant Outdoors

4-6 weeks after LFD

Leeks are very hardy and can be transplanted outdoors quite early (6 weeks before the last frost date). However they will grow faster in your greenhouse, so you may as well leave them there until the last frost date. You will then get bigger plants to put into the ground.

The plants should be planted out when they are about 8˝ tall. Some people advise trimming the tops and roots, but it probably isn't a good idea.

Dibber:  The simplest way to plant Leek seedlings is with a dibber. In fact a desire to plant a lot of Leeks is a sufficient reason to get (or make) a dibber.

1. Mark out the required 4˝ to 6˝ hole depth (depending on size of plants) on the side of the dibber, so you know how deep to go.

2. Then, simply punch a series of holes in the soil, and drop a plant into each hole

3. Water the plants by putting a trickle of water in each hole. There is no need to fill the hole with soil, enough soil will wash down into the bottom of the hole to cover the roots. It couldn’t be easier, or quicker.

Trench: You can also transplant the seedlings into a 6˝ to 8˝ deep trench, but it’s a lot more work. Dig the trench, lay the plants in it at the right spacing and then plant them almost up to the growing point. The trench is re-filled slowly to blanch the stems and provide a greater length of the most desirable white stem. If you fill the trench all at once, there is some danger that the stem may rot.

Rows: Leeks can also be planted in a row on level ground. They are then hilled up as they grow, to blanch the lower stems

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