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Cowpea: Big Red Ripper

An heirloom variety from North Carolina and Virginia. Large number of peas per pod. A good flavored table pea with 10" long pods containing as many as 18 large peas per pod! Reddish-green pods are borne high and are easy to see in the foliage. The vines are resistant to very hot, dry summers. Use fresh or dried. Very popular in Texas.

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Cowpea: California Blackeye Pea

An old standard variety; vigorous, high-yielding vines. Thomas Jefferson grew Blackeye Peas in the 1770’s. Originating in Africa, Cowpeas are easy to grow and are very popular in the South. A very ancient crop.

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Cowpea: Carrapichio

Good yields of Khaki-colored peas and long pods. An attractive pea that is very rare and uniquely colored.

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Cowpea: Clay

This pea was a staple of the Southern armies during the American Civil War. We were excited to be able to find this living treasure of the 1860’s. Tasty peas are the earthy color of clay. Rare!

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Cowpea: Cowpea (Bush)

Cowpea can be used at all stages of growth as a vegetable crop. The tender green leaves are an important food source in Africa and are prepared as a pot herb, like spinach. Immature snapped pods are used in the same way as snap beans, often being mixed with other foods. Green Cowpea seeds are boiled as a fresh vegetable, or may be canned or frozen. Dry mature seeds are also suitable for boiling and canning.

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Cowpea: Cowpea (Vine)

The cowpea can be used at all stages of growth as a vegetable crop. The tender green leaves are an important food source in Africa and are prepared as a pot herb, like spinach. Immature snapped pods are used in the same way as snap beans, often being mixed with other foods. Green Cowpea seeds are boiled as a fresh vegetable, or may be canned or frozen. Dry mature seeds are also suitable for boiling and canning.

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Cowpea: Gray-Speckled Palapye

Flavorful, gray-speckled peas in large pods; very early and perfect for the North. From a market in Palapye, Botswana. Rare.

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Cowpea: Hercules

Large, brown seeds are the biggest we offer. 8-9" pods held upright on bushy plants with short runners. Easy to shell. 1981, Clemson AES.

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Cowpea: Mississippi Silver

Widely adapted and an excellent performer in hot humid climates, especially the Mid-Atlantic and south. Does well in northern areas with longer seasons. Pods average 6-1/2 " long, and are silver colored, occasionally streaked with rose. Easy to shell. Resistant to fusarium wilt and root knot nematodes as well as tolerant to viruses.

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Cowpea: Monkey Tail

Hardy, rambling vines produce extra-long pods with unusual cocoa/tan-colored beans.

From the UCD Seed Saving Project; collected in Africa.

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Cowpea: Old Timer (Purple Hull Speckled)

Short, bush plants produce colorful, purple, 7-inch pods that are filled with medium-sized, tan peas that have dark speckles. A fine variety that is good for small gardens.

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Cowpea: Penny Rile

Khaki-tan color, medium-sized peas, heavy yields. The peas are great for soup. Grown by a Mr. Martin, whose family grew these vines to feed their livestock and as a food source for the family to help with long winters.

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Cowpea: Pinkeye Purple Hull

An early, heavy yielding, semi-bush variety with good disease resistance. Can be double-cropped in the Mid-Atlantic and south. Pods contain elongated white peas with purple or pink eyes. Use for canning, freezing, or fresh eating.

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Cowpea: Queen Anne Blackeye Pea

'Queen Anne' is a very dependable and heavy producer. Yields 8 to 12 seeds per 7 to 9" pod. Plants are compact, 26 " tall with no runners. Highly recommended for green shell or dry use, freezing, or canning. Can be grown in most northern states.

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Cowpea: Stick Up

Pods tend to “Stick Up” on the vines, hence the name. This heirloom was once popular in French Fork, Louisiana, and it helped the local people of the area get through the Great Depression. Small brown seed.

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Cowpea: Whippoorwill

Once the standard for southern peas, this variety is drought-tolerant and will grow in almost all soils. 5' vines produce loads of 7-8" green pods with a purple tinge. Mature seeds are small and light brown with black speckles. Seeds are good eaten green or dried. Brought to the Americas from Africa during the slave trade, grown by Jefferson at Monticello.

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Cowpea: White Acre

This high-yielding heirloom southern pea has a vigorous growth habit and superior flavor. Quick early growth and dense foliage reduces much of the need for weeding. Peas themselves are small compared to other southern peas, average 18-25 peas per pod.

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Cowpea: Zipper Cream

Southern favorite. Bushy 2-3' plants bear prolifically. 6-9" pods with large, creamy-white seeds, 18-20 seeds/pod, easy to shell. Unusually, seeds have a taste between English peas and cowpeas when fresh.