Plant Guide

Scumb_doll lindarobshaw
91104
Pasadena

Raspberry : Shortcake

Raspberry: Shortcake image

Dwarf

This revolutionary, thornless raspberry is a little dwarf of a raspberry with an endearing compact growth habit that thrives in patio pots or in your landscape. For the first time ever, whether you have an urban balcony or a country estate, you can savor the experience of fresh raspberries from your very own plants.

Rubus Rosaceae idaeus
This is an example of the timeline you would see based on your growing conditions.

Crop Care After First year

Raspberries are pretty low maintenance if they like the soil and the climate. If anything, they can get invasive - making thinning the most important for up-keep.

Water Needs

Moderate

Raspberries are deep rooted, so they only need a moderate amount of water. Drip irrigation is highly recommended to avoid fungal disease on the berries.

Fertilizer Needs

Heavy

Raspberries should be fertilized every Spring with a good organic fertilizer or compost mix.

Pruning

1 time

Raspberry plants typically produce on two-years growth, with everbearing varieties fruiting on first-year's growth. To avoid dead canes, remove all canes that fruited this year. You will need to prune every year after harvest. This is typically done in winter, when tasks in the garden slow.

Side Dressing

Standard Mix, 5 pound(s) per 100 sq. ft., 1 time

To encourage new year's growth, give plants 5 lbs standard mix per 100 square feet. When plants are growing vigorously they will benefit from increased side dressing, up to 10 lbs per 100 square feet.

Watering

Water, 0.5 inch(es), 2 times a week

Raspberries need moist soil at all times for best production. If 1" of water isn't enough, give them another inch. Watering also depends on your local weather; don't water if it's raining, or water more frequently if it's dry. Just be sure to keep soil moist but never soggy for the best crop. The best way to know how much moisture is in your soil is to feel 2" below the soil line. If it's dry, water.

Support

Yes

Raspberries are top-heavy and will greatly benefit from the support of a trellis. They also need good air circulation in their canes, which will come with the support.

The most common support is a series of 6 foot high posts (brace with guy wires or angled posts as necessary), with T bars and 1/8" wires strung between.



Crop Care First year

Raspberries are pretty low maintenance if they like the soil and the climate. If anything, they can get invasive - making thinning the most important for up-keep.

Water Needs

Moderate

Raspberries are deep rooted, so they only need a moderate amount of water. Drip irrigation is highly recommended to avoid fungal disease on the berries.

Fertilizer Needs

Heavy

Raspberries should be fertilized every Spring with a good organic fertilizer or compost mix.

Support

Yes

Raspberries are top-heavy and will greatly benefit from the support of a trellis. They also need good air circulation in their canes, which will come with the support.

The most common support is a series of 6 foot high posts (brace with guy wires or angled posts as necessary), with T bars and 1/8" wires strung between.