> 3-4 weeks after LFD

1. Plant out the seedlings up to their first true leaves and water immediately. If the weather isn’t warm, you might want to cover them with cloches.

> Warm, Hot

Cucumbers are native to the tropics and absolutely must have warm soil (70˚ F minimum) for good germination and growth. Consequently they are among the last crops to be planted out in spring. Most varieties fruit better in short days, so they tend to be more productive later in the summer.

> When outdoor temp: 60°F to 90°F, optimal temp 65°F to 75°F
> When min soil temp: 60°F

Cucumbers take 2 weeks to germinate at 60 degrees, but only 3 days at 85 degrees. 

Spacing

18.0"-48.0", (3 per 3x3) plants per sq ft

Intensive bed spacing varies from 15 to 24" apart, depending upon the soil and the variety.

In intensive beds, it is probably best to sow cucumbers in 2 alternate rows down the middle of the bed. You can inter-plant a fast growing crop at the same time, to take advantage of the temporarily vacant space.

Trellised plants can be grown 6 to 8" apart in the row, with 24 to 36" between the rows.

Trellised cucumbers are the most efficient use of space in the garden, as long as they do not shade other plants that need sunlight.

Cucumber hills are planted 36 to 48" apart.

Cucumber hills are built by digging a hole 12" in diameter and 12" deep. Half fill the hole with compost and then return the soil to the hole, leaving a slightly raised mound. Several seeds are sown on top of the mound, and then thinned to the best 2 or 3 plants. The hills are spaced about 3 to 4 feet apart, to give the plants room to sprawl.

Transplant Outdoors

3-4 weeks after LFD

1. Plant out the seedlings up to their first true leaves and water immediately. If the weather isn’t warm, you might want to cover them with cloches.

Support

At planting

Cucumbers take up a considerable amount of space if left to sprawl randomly across the ground. Fortunately many varieties are good climbers and will happily use vertical space instead of ground space. Trellised plants may take up only one tenth of the bed space of unsupported ones. Trellising can increase yields by as much as 100%, because fewer fruits are lost to rot, disease or slugs and there is more light for photosynthesis. The fruits will also be straighter and cleaner.

If building a trellis seems like a good idea, but too much work, you can also plant them along a wire fence. You can also use cages of 6" mesh steel reinforcing wire, 3 feet in diameter and 6 feet high. These can work well, though the plants may eventually outgrow them. These cages can even be covered with plastic to protect the plants from late frost.

Many kinds of trellises have been used for supporting Cucumbers, including fencing wire, nylon netting and Bamboo canes. Be creative, but make sure it is strong enough to support the considerable weight of a fruiting crop.

In very dry areas it is better to leave the plants close to the ground, rather than trellising them. They can then create their own little humid micro-climate and lose water less rapidly.

If you are going to support your cucumbers, you should set it up before planting. This will minimize disturbance to the young plants.